Tag Archives: f1

Oh, the violence! Nordschleife under 310 seconds! (IN CAR)

This is a 05:09:9xx (5 minutes, 10 seconds) lap around the challenging Nordschleife track, in its most faithful digital laser scanned version, using the superb “rFactor 2” simulator, driving Michael Schumacher’s Ferrari F1 2004.
I do these laps just for fun, and as a form of physical exercise. To achieve these relatively fast times, one has to commit, mind and body! This particular lap was intense, hard, and great fun. Extremely demanding action, for 5+ straight minutes.

Recently (May 2020), the Nordschleife track has become my testing playground. I have now tested Prost’s McLaren F1 1986, Montoya’s Williams F1 2004, and now Schumacher’s Ferrari F1 2004, always improving. Next on list is Grosjean’s Lotus F1 2012.

Oh, the violence! Nordschleife under 310 seconds! (TV CAM)

This is a 05:09:9xx (5 minutes, 10 seconds) lap around the challenging Nordschleife track, in its most faithful digital laser scanned version, using the superb “rFactor 2” simulator, driving Michael Schumacher’s Ferrari F1 2004.
I do these laps just for fun, and as a form of physical exercise. To achieve these relatively fast times, one has to commit, mind and body! This particular lap was intense, hard, and great fun. Extremely demanding action, for 5+ straight minutes.

Recently (May 2020), the Nordschleife track has become my testing playground. I have now tested Prost’s McLaren F1 1986, Montoya’s Williams F1 2004, and now Schumacher’s Ferrari F1 2004, always improving. Next on list is Grosjean’s Lotus F1 2012.

Nordschleife under 5 minutes is getting nearer – Juan Pablo Montoya, William BMW F1 2004

This is a 05:12:xxx lap around the 20+ KM long Nordschleife track, @Germany, running Juan Pablo Montoya’s 2004 William BMW F1 car.

This lap is 46 seconds faster (!!) than the one I did on Alain Prost’s 1986 McLaren F1 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Fe6Q7qaXTo). This translates to a progress of ~2.5 seconds per year, in the 18 years of rules and technology changes that separate both cars.

The 2004 Williams BMW F1 seemed easier to drive than the 1986 McLaren, which has sudden bursts of power and requires a very firm hand on any acceleration. The older car also produces less downforce and cannot handle corners with the impetuosity of the Williams, demanding an intelligent preparation of any corner.

The 2004 Williams is greater fun! With my current setup, it is ~30 kph faster on the long straight. It can brake later and, more importantly, it does not immediately spin around, when subject to extreme – and bordering carelessness – direction changes. Overall, it tolerates a violent lap and it rewards the player with considerable brain and body stimulus. After a few minutes of trying to push this car, one gets tense, awaken and sweaty! True physical exercise. I adore it!

This time of 05:12:xxx can surely be improved, but not by much. I doubt that I can make this car go sub 5 minutes, but I will try.

Montoya vs Schumacher, Nordschleife, Williams BMW F1 2004

During my attempts to perform a great lap around the Nordschleife 20+ KM track, racing the 2004 Williams BMW F1 car – which would culminate in a spectacular 05:12:xxx achievement as captured on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vReEBXMRxU
-, there was one situation where the other Williams BMW, driven by Ralph Schumacher on the 2004 F1 season, got on the way and did not play clean at all.
I managed to record the ~1 minute long sequence of “friction” between the cars, until a successful overtake finally happened.

Racing Nico Hulkenberg's 2017 Renault F1 around Silverstone

On 2019-07-13, during the 2019 Formula 1 Silverstone weekend, I decided to try the 2017 F1 cars around that circuit. I played rFactor2 for 30 minutes, racing Nico Hulkenberg’s Renault, on soft tires. I am yet to learn how to activate the DRS, which is inexcusable, since I have played this mod before.
It was fun, as always. I recorded this 01:32:xxx race lap, where I am in pursuit of Massa on a Williams, and being chased by Hamilton on a Mercedes. I managed to overtake Massa in a maneuver that from the next Sunday on, would be named a “Leclerc pass”, due to what happened in the real race.

Team AM League since Austria

I started a Formula 1 “Fantasy League” named “Team AM League since Austria.” I am quite late to this F1 fantasy thing, and I am not quite sure I understand it or its purpose. For example, I built my team ahead of today’s Austria GP, and my picks scored big (including the top 3: Verstappen, Leclerc, Bottas), but last time I checked I had no points. Maybe that is because the results aren’t yet official, I don’t know.
https://fantasy.formula1.com/leaderboards/league?league_id=158202

I will not be sending emails, but anyone is welcome to join with the code 0ac53ce019. If you prefer, here is a direct link to subscribe:
https://fantasy.formula1.com/join?league_code=0ac53ce019

rFactor 2 is awesome

If there is one gaming genre that can be unfair to those really pushing ahead, it is the “racing” genre. Regular gamers are used to absurdly unrealistic software, where vehicles respond like they’ve done since the ZX Spectrum days, meaning like indestructible spaceships that make good use of the surrounding structures to stay on course. The average gamer can’t be bothered to learn about precision driving and delicate handling, using proper input devices. Surprisingly, professional game critics usually adhere to the same shallow standards: the “F1” series from CodeMasters is a very good example of how ridiculously deceiving ratings and scores can be. The “F1” games score high in most specialized publications and have been celebrated in BAFTA events (!), but they are less interactive than playing with a toy train in rails.

CodeMasters’ “F1” looks wonderful, but plays horribly, tricking the user to think that he/she is in control, when in fact, the player’s freedom is severely limited; it is literally like driving on rails with narrow margins for anything creative. It is disgusting because for casual racers and other outsiders it appears a worthy experience. It is not a worthy experience, and it is unfair that the true racing simulators must flourish in niches, under the shadow of such miserable titles.

From my experience, one of the “true” simulators available today is “rFactor 2” (RF2).  RF2 is fun, demanding and reasonably realistic. If you ever drove a competition car, you’ll probably notice the extra care: for example, tires start cold, then get warmer; tires will get flat spots if you lock them under braking; and the car will get damaged, and respond accordingly, even if in very subtle ways, if & when you hit obstacles.

RF2 tires’ physics is unique. I am not writing about different temperatures for each tire – I am writing about different temperatures across different regions of every tire! It feels “organic”, it feels true! The vehicles are responsive and the pedals truly analogue. It is literally a physical exercise to put consistent fast laps against 100% strong computer opponents: in fact, you’ll probably sweat and burn a significant amount of calories. For real!

rfactor2_1